Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Speed Up Your Novel With Pacing: A Guest Post By Jeff Bennington

Today I'm sharing the first in a series of guest posts I have scheduled this summer. Since my days are consumed by the wonderful art of revisions, I've invited some fellow writers to stop in, meet my readers, and share some thoughts on the craft. If you are interested in guest blogging, send an e-mail to pauljosephwrites AT gmail DOT com. I'd love to host you!

Jeff BenningtonSpeed up Your Novel With Pacing
By Jeff Bennigton
Author of Reunion

As a newer author, I’m always looking for ways to improve my writing. Currently, I’m wrapping up my latest novel, Act of Vengeance, and nailing down characterization and pacing. Characterization is of extreme importance to me as it controls the attachment readers have toward my protagonist and guest stars. Pacing, however, controls the tempo, that is, the speed in which the reader will move through the pages.

The idea of good pacing is to intentionally form sentences and “white space” in a way that slows down or speeds up the pace of a scene. In other words, a protagonist’s self-contemplative moment might have a slower pace with longer sentences that express his thoughts and inner feelings. A car chase should be faster. See what I mean?

In addition, if you’re writing a scene with lots of dialogue, white space will really make a difference, creating a fast paced conversation.

I’m so much faster now.
Really?
Yes.
How?
Easy. I just picked up my pace!
Okay. I get it.
Good.

Now, to demonstrate this in real time and with a real novel, I’m going to adjust the pace of (the first few paragraphs) my first chapter of Act of Vengeance, right now, right before your eyes. It should only take a few minutes. What you read will be a before and after demonstration of how, as a writer, you can generate a faster pace. You see, the goal of my first line, first paragraph and first chapter is to create a vacuum that sucks the reader in…quickly!

Here goes…

Before:
Detective Rick Burns raced into the upscale Indianapolis neighborhood, slammed on the brakes, and stepped out of his rusty red Pontiac. He peered into the night as the crowd gathered, took a deep breath, and prayed to God that this murder would not be like the others. The heaviness, the blood, the darkness had finally pricked its sharp edge into his soul. Red and blue lights enveloped his body and danced across the frightened neighbors who had gathered together, shaking and shivering. The car door let out a lingering squeak as he slammed it shut and then he hurried toward the crime scene.
     The detective rushed past an ambulance and heard a woman whimpering to his right. He turned toward the sound, continued forward and studied her face with twisted brow. The woman stood near a paramedic and a police officer with a wool blanket over her shoulders, warmed from the night breeze. Streams of mascara ran down her cheeks like a river of death. But her shoulders didn’t shake, and she didn’t sob or wail in disbelief.
     Detective Burns examined her slow, careful movements as she gingerly wiped her tears. Her eyes lacked the hollow, desperately confused grief that he’d seen far too often. Lady of the house, or mistress perhaps—whatever the case, something about her didn’t ring true. He pulled his notepad and pen from his jacket pocket and scribbled a few words regarding his first suspect: Female Caucasian, mid-fifties, pin-striped suit, stilettos, short red hair shaved in the back with a flaming twist burning upward, approximately five-foot-eight, no blood visible, September 13, 11:00 p.m.

And now I’m going to pick up the pace without changing a word…

After:
Detective Rick Burns raced into the upscale Indianapolis neighborhood, slammed on the brakes, and stepped out of his rusty red Pontiac. 
     He peered into the night as the crowd gathered, took a deep breath and prayed to God that this murder would not be like the others. The heaviness, the blood, the darkness had finally pricked its sharp edge into his soul.
     Red and blue lights enveloped his body and danced across the frightened neighbors who had gathered together, shaking and shivering. The car door let out a lingering squeak as he slammed it shut and then he hurried toward the crime scene.
     The detective rushed past an ambulance and heard a woman whimpering to his right. He turned toward the sound, continued forward and studied her face with twisted brow. The woman stood near a paramedic and a police officer with a wool blanket over her shoulders, warmed from the night breeze. Streams of mascara ran down her cheeks like a river of death. But her shoulders didn’t shake, and she didn’t sob or wail in disbelief.
     Detective Burns examined her slow, careful movements as she gingerly wiped her tears.
     Her eyes lacked the hollow, desperately confused grief that he’d seen far too often.
     Lady of the house, or mistress perhaps—whatever the case, something about her didn’t ring true. 
     He pulled his notepad and pen from his jacket pocket and scribbled a few words regarding his first suspect:
     Female Caucasian.
     Mid-fifties.
     Pin-striped suit.
     Stilettos.
     Short red hair shaved in the back with a flaming twist burning upward.
     Approximately five-foot-eight.
     No blood visible.
     September 13, 11:00 p.m.


So what do you think? Did you notice a difference? I did. It’s faster and easier for me to read. I think I’ll keep it. If you have time, try this exercise with your writing and see if it helps move you along a bit faster, bringing you and hopefully your readers deeper into the story at a faster clip. Thanks for reading. Let me know if you have other ideas that can improve pacing.

Jeff Bennington is the author of Reunion and other thrillers. He blogs at The Writing Bomb and Criminal Minds at Work.

REUNION: http://www.amazon.com/Reunion-ebook/dp/B004S7AR0E/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2

The Rumblin’: http://www.amazon.com/Rumblin-Short-Story-ebook/dp/B00422LGI2/ref=pd_sim_kinc_4?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2

Killing the Giants (revised): http://www.amazon.com/Killing-the-Giants-ebook/dp/B002WYJPL2/ref=pd_sim_kinc_2?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2

The Writing Bomb (blog): http://www.thewritingbomb.blogspot.com

Website: http://www.jeffbennington.com

Twenty Years After the School Shooting.

Monday, June 27, 2011

Who Is Your Ideal Reader?

In On Writing, Stephen King discusses writing for an ideal reader. This passage that has been simmering in my head all day, much like a rotisserie chicken rotating on a spit:

Do all opinions weigh the same?  Not for me.  In the end, I listen most closely to Tabby, because she's the one I write for, the one I want to wow.  If you're writing primarily for one person besides yourself, I'd advise you to pay very close attention to that person's opinion.....And if what you hear makes sense, then make the changes.  You can't let the whole world into your story, but you can let in the ones that matter the most.  And you should.

Call that one person you write for Ideal Reader.  He or she is going to be in your writing room all the time.....You'll find yourself bending the story even before Ideal Reader glimpses so much as the first sentence.  I.R. will help you get outside yourself a little, to actually read your work in progress as an audience would while you're still working.  This is perhaps the best way of all to make sure you stick to story, a way of playing the audience even while there's no audience there and you're totally in charge.

King's philosophy makes perfect sense; it's impossible to please everyone, as that automatically sets us up for failure.  By identifying a "target" reader - the him or her we hope to impress - we can use that profile to help make decisions along the way.  What direction will that reader most enjoy?  What twists will make that reader turn the page?  What can I offer my I.R. that no other book has provided?

In February, JM Tohline discussed the benefits of writing for an audience of one. He shared that The Great Lenore, his debut novel released on June 15, was written for himself.  His thinking was that if he loved what he created, readers with similar taste would love it as well.

Jordan went on to point out the following:

I have now realized that there is a reason they do not advise that you "write for you." At least, not to write strictly for you. It is because you are biased. Either positively or negatively. Toward yourself.

Makes sense, right?

And so, they tell you to write for someone else. And the same foundational principle holds true: If that reader loves your book, then everyone else who likes the same books as that reader will love your book.

For months, I've pondered if I have an ideal reader, figuring if I need to think about it, I obviously don't.  My hope is I'm writing a story to be enjoyed by a wide range of readers.  All teens are involved in the bullying cycle, either as a bully, victim, or bystander.  Likewise, parents of teens are involved in the bullying system, as they are raising either a bully, a victim, or a bystander.  Of course, should my book ever be printed, not everyone is will like it.  So, who exactly am I writing it for?  Who am I aiming to entertain?

After some extensive reflection, I discovered I do have an ideal reader.  I've always had an ideal reader, I just didn't realize it at first.  Despite my current job situation, I'm fortunate to have maintained positive relationships with many former students.  Now that most of them are licensed drivers, they seek me out in Borders and join me coffee.  They send e-mails as college acceptances arrive, to share their prom date, and to complain about how "hard" high school is (just wait, right?)  For this project, one student happens to be my ideal reader.

My I.R. is entering his senior year of high school.  It's been four years since he sat in my classroom, but we never lost contact.  In fact, I've become friends with his entire family.  We've had many dinners together.  His mom is one of my strongest references; she is also one of my top supporters on this writing journey (and continues waiting for the day she defeats me in a Words With Friends match).  

When I first babbled about wanting to write a novel, this student did more than tell me to go for it - he cited specific reasons why he thought I could.  Teachers are supposed to motivate kids; it's rather surreal when they motivate us.  Others in the field can identify those mature beyond their years; my I.R. is one of them.

To me, it makes sense to have a teen I.R. while writing a YA Contemporary.  I am writing for teens, so why not choose one of them.  My I.R. witnesses the very situations I'm addressing in the book; he's the same age and gender as my protagonist.  They share tastes in books and music, enjoy the same food, and grow up in similar family circumstances.  And, although my I.R. is not an avid reader, he is capable of being reeled into a good story.  I
t's my job to write one that pulls him inside.  

If I'm successful, my ideal reader will love my book.  And, if my ideal reader loves my book, hopefully those with similar tastes and preferences love it as well. That's really all I can hope for.

Who is your ideal reader?  How was he or she chosen? 

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

It Gets Better - Authors And Illustrators Unite

Greetings!  I'm taking a quick break from revisions in order to share the video dominating my facebook feed this week.  In the event you haven't yet discovered it, I encourage you to take a gander.  Some of my favorite YA authors put this together for teens struggling with bullying, depression, and suicidal thoughts.  It's nice seeing so many people speak out on this issue.

On that note, I'm returning to my cave.  Enjoy the video, folks!

Friday, June 17, 2011

Yesterday Was Thursday, Thursday. Today I-Is Friday, Friday.

Partyin', partyin' (Yeah).

Okay, enough of that.  I apologize; their isn't a lot of oxygen flowing in my writing cave.  My capillaries are a tad clogged.

As we launch into the weekend (for those of you who observe weekends, that is), I wanted to share some news and opportunities for you to check out.

1.  Michele Shaw is having a Super Spectacular Book Giveaway. Once her blog reaches 150 followers (at the moment she is six away from her goal), Michele is giving away three  YA novels to one lucky commenter.  The winner selects three out of six books, including Jay Asher's THIRTEEN REASONS WHY and Laurie Halse Anderson's SPEAK.

2.   Kelly Lyman is hosting her 200 Follower Giveaway.  She is giving away two different prize packages, both which include a $10 B&N gift card.  The deadline is June 24.  I was the lucky winner of Kelly's last giveaway and I received my prize package yesterday.  Feast your eyes on this:


3.  Kevin Craig will be giving away three copies of his YA debut SUMMER ON FIRE, a book I personally can't wait to read.  There are two ways you can enter his giveaway; one is as easy as tweeting a link to the post and commenting that you did so.  The deadline is July 1.

4.  Congratulations to my buddy Duncan D. Horne on the birth of his second daughter, Leah Marie.  Leah was born Wednesday at 3:37 AM.

5.  And finally, a huge congratulations is owed to JM Tohline.  THE GREAT LENORE is already sold out on Amazon; however, copies are available online through B&N, Borders, or his publishing house, Atticus Books.  Amazon will begin shipping again on June 21.

Have a great weekend, folks!  Any exciting plans?

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Final Winner: GREAT LENORE Giveaway

Congratulations to Matthew Vanacore, the fourth and final winner of my GREAT LENORE giveaway.  Matt, e-mail me your address and I'll get that on its way.

Thank you to everyone who participated in these four giveaways and helped spread the word.  THE GREAT LENORE entered the world this morning, weighing in at 204 pages and 5 x 8 inches.  Dad and book are doing well.  So, as you browse for selections to read this summer, keep this one in the back of your mind.

To all previous winners, I'll be e-mailing you as soon as I receive shipment confirmation.  So far, only one has come in.  It seems they don't ship all pre-orders at the same time.

On that note, I must return to my revision party of one, which is where I'll be hanging the majority of the summer.  In the meantime, you can check out my recent posts by clicking the links below.


Tuesday, June 14, 2011

From Hatter To Hater: Reflections From The Past Ten Years


Ten years ago today, I received my high school diploma.  At the time, I thought it was a big deal.  At the time, I guess it sort of was. 

I was never a fan of high school.  Honestly, I felt my school bullied me more than other kids did.  When we moved from Kentucky, my guidance counselor called me to her office and told me to get involved.  What she didn't tell me was I would be rejected from just about every activity, club, or extra-curricular I attempted to join.  Nobody wanted the new kid, so I spent the bulk of my first year alone in a new school. 

I had some great teachers.  I also had teachers who made me feel really bad about myself.  Ever overhear a teacher say something rather unflattering about you to the group of kids you were working with?  You don't forget something like that.

I remember watching other kids and thinking how ridiculous they were.  Fights erupted over the most inane issues - crushes, drug and alcohol supply, dances, getting rides, who sits shotgun, sweet sixteen parties, prom plans, being invited to the kegger, and weekend vacations to the shore.  These dramatic escapades evolved into inspiration for quality shows like Laguna Beach and Jersey Shore.  Thanks, Drama Queens.  Thanks for hijacking cable television.

I'm still not sure how I worked as a teacher.  For one, I hate public speaking.  I don't have joyful, giddy memories from my own schooling.  I hate waking up early.  I hate wearing a shirt and tie.  I hate working with other people.  I avoid faculty rooms like I avoid a colonic.  And yet, for three years, I loved my job. 

Considering the outcome of my career, it's no surprise I developed a hatred for public education.  It left an unpleasant flavor on my tongue and kept me in a bad mood until I discovered writing.  On days like today, it's healthy for me to spend time reflecting - to think about how I've grown and recognize what I can be proud of.  In honor of my ten year graduation anniversary, I decided to share some highlights of my reflection.  Thanks for joining me today.

Ten Accomplishments:
  1. Graduating from college, magna cum laude, in four years with my Bachelor's in Social Studies Education.
  2. A phenomenal student teaching experience: I taught Sociology, Contemporary Problems, and Global Perspectives.  The majority of my students were 18 year-old seniors.  I was 21 at the time.
  3. Earning my Master's Degree in Special Education with a 4.0 GPA.
  4. Won $1000 from a local radio station.
  5. Achieving additional teaching certifications in middle school language arts and mathematics.
  6. Enjoying three years as a seventh grade social studies teacher.
  7. Surviving one year as a middle school learning support case manager.
  8. Upholding a gym membership (and using it) for the past six years.
  9. Designing and maintaining a blog (and the coinciding relationships) I am proud of.
  10. Completing the first draft of my first YA novel.
Ten Things I'd Tell My Seventeen Year-Old Self:
  1. Do not make decisions based on relationships; make decisions you feel are right in your heart.
  2. Those AP exams mean nothing.  Don't sweat it.
  3. You don't need physics or trigonometry for any career path that interests you.  Stand up to your counselor and take creative writing instead.
  4. You like to read.  You don't think so because your teachers assign boring books.  But you do.  See that YA Contemporary shelf - go explore it!
  5. Buzz your hair.  It will save you a ton of money on haircuts and products.
  6. The woman speaking on the third floor goes by the name Laurie Halse Anderson.  She's about to become a famous YA author (and for now, she lives around the corner from you!)  Cut your stupid gym class and go listen to her presentation.  The book she's releasing (Speak) will become a controversial bestseller.
  7. Wear sunscreen.  Just because you're dark, Italian, and don't burn does not mean you don't need it.
  8. Don't idolize that substitute too much.  In eight years, she's getting arrested for having sex with a sophomore in a van.  Just sayin...
  9. Stop worrying so much about grades, GPA, and class rank.  No, you will not be satisfied where you end up because you are a perfectionist.  But guess what; it will not matter one bit.  You can relax.  In fact, during your third year of teaching, your principal will ban assigning and grading homework.  Can't be that important, can it?
  10. You have a handful of friends who will still be around to support your writing journey, and they are not necessarily the people you would expect.  You also have some really obnoxious friends who would never lift a finger to help you.  If you were bleeding to death in the street, they would step over you on their way to get free water ice.  Thankfully, they will not be in your life forever, so do yourself a favor and cut the cord.  
Ten Lessons I've Learned Along The Way:
  1. The world is not fair.
  2. Hard work does not always pay off.
  3. We don't control nearly as much as we like to think we do.
  4. Never let your job define you.
  5. Friendships do not have to be face to face.
  6. It's okay to make mistakes.
  7. Mistakes cannot always be fixed.
  8. Not everyone can get paid for doing what they love.
  9. The only opinion that matters is your own.
  10. Life has funny ways of coming to your defense.  Sometimes, it's immediate.  Other times, it takes years.  What we see in front of us is not always the original photograph; often, it's an altered replica adjusted to portray what a person wants us to see.  Yes, people wrong us.  No, it's never justified.  But sometimes, you learn more to a story than what you thought to be true.  It may not erase the hurt, but it may let us view a situation from a different perspective.  And sometimes, it's enough to bring closure; to let us move forward from an experience or memory that haunted us far too long.
It took time to find a version of this song I liked on Youtube.  This is the song the senior choir voted to perform at graduation.  Oddly enough, it's included in many of my writing playlists.  The lyrics sort of haunt me.

Friday, June 10, 2011

How Can Readers Help Debut Authors?

I've been awaiting the release of Matt Blackstone's debut, A SCARY SCENE IN A SCARY MOVIE, for months now.  It's everything I love wrapped into one package.  It's YA.  It's contemporary.  It has substance.  And the OCD storyline pertains to my background in education, particularly my Master's in Special Education.  As a former educator, I believe there is a need for high interest literature addressing mental illness in teens.  Matt's novel will spotlight that poor kid in the classroom who pisses off everyone, including the teacher, because he or she is misunderstood.

Last night, I happened to receive an invitation to Matt's book signing via the almighty facebook.  Normally, I ignore these, as I have never once stumbled upon one close to where I live.  But this one is doable, and for this book - and this author - I would make the effort. 

The plan was to buy the book first thing that day, then read it on the train on route to the signing.  When I arrived at Borders this morning, I asked the manager if they were getting any in stock.  Of course, he told me no, and that I'd need to pre-order it on the website.  Unfortunately, pre-ordering does not work if you want it in your hands the day it's released (it wouldn't arrive for another 3-5 days).

I called our local B&N and got the same answer.  I went through the list of Indie bookstores - all of which have not yet ordered any.  And then, out of curiosity, I went back to the Borders manager and asked him to look up other books I'm anticipating.  Out of seven, a whopping one has been ordered for the store.

The manager could tell I wasn't happy.  I started thinking about a side of this business I hadn't previously considered: that it is bloody murder for a debut author to get his book on the shelves.  Mr. Manager said it's based on a number of factors: genre, publisher, demographics, early reviews, endorsements, blurbing, and more.  I said that sucks.

But, I also walked away with valuable information on how readers can help our favorite debut authors:

1.  When a book of interest is scheduled for release, always ask the customer service desk if the store will get copies in stock.  Even if the answer is no, you are "title dropping."  If enough people consistently ask for a title, managers will recognize it by name and be more likely to place an order.

2.  When you pre-order a book, do it in a bookstore and have a bookseller assist you.  Yes, most of us can do it ourselves, but this method once again allows staff members to hear a customer asking for a title.  The more it happens, the more likely they are to order it for their store.

3.  The major chains (i.e. B&N and Borders) order on a store by store basis.  Corporate does not dictate what the stores carry; each location is responsible for their own inventory.  But, managers do converse with one another.  If an unknown book (or unknown author) starts selling in one store, it is likely that name/title will be passed along to other managers in the network.  They want to carry what sells.  Help your books sell.

4.  When you see your favorite books in stores, pick them up.  Browse the pages, even if you've already read it.  Take it to the cafe, sit with it for a while, and leave it on the table.  The manager told me it's certainly annoying when people do not put books away, but at the same time, he pays attention to the titles pulled from shelves.  It means someone picked it up and was interested in the book.

5.  Call bookstores you don't visit and ask if they are carrying (or plan to carry) a certain title you want to read.  Many stores keep a log of what customers are asking for.  When the same title starts appearing often, they will strongly consider giving it a shot and ordering some copies for the store.

How else can readers promote their favorite debut authors?


Publishers Weekly Reviews A Scary Scene In A Scary Movie By Matt Blackstone:

“Blackstone makes a bold and idiosyncratic debut with this boisterous novel about a 14-year-old boy with obsessive-compulsive disorder. The author effectively renders the messy, noisy interior world of Rene Fowler, who lives alone with his single mother and struggles to not just survive but enjoy the chaos of high school. Rene is wedded to his routines and his habits (perpetually smelling his left hand, wearing rubber bands on his wrists, not moving if the time adds up to 13–8:32 or 5:44, for example), and relying on his Batman cape for security. He also has a serious crush, red-haired Ariel, his ‘angel,’ and a new friend–a ‘freakishly tall,’ social butterfly, Gio. When Rene’s long-estranged and boorish father returns home, Gio and Rene run away to Manhattan, where they come across Ariel, and their paradise/nightmare adventure there takes up the last third of the book. Rene’s honest, often humorous voice is as compelling as it is exhausting. Blackstone succeeds in creating a singular teenager who happens to have OCD; readers will emerge with a close understanding of the mind and heart of someone with this disorder.”   Ages 12–up. (July)



Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Checking In, Plus Announcements

Greetings, friends!  Everyone staying cool?  Good, because according to the iPhone, tomorrow will be worse!

I don't have a formal post planned; more so, I just wanted to check in.  For the past two weeks, I've been fully immersed in revisions, a process I love and hate simultaneously.  I mean, it's pretty dang overwhelming!

I'm following a consistent schedule for the summer, one that provides uninterrupted revision time that begins first thing in the morning.  For me, it seems best to wake up refreshed and dive  in before I have time to get distracted (or annoyed).  I'm also editing in layers, so knowing how long the path in front of me is keeps me focused on the task at hand.  Of course, it also limits the hours I spend on blogger.

I will still make an effort to post as much as possible, but it will probably be less frequent over the next few weeks.  Blogging is one of the things on my evening schedule, though I'm learning that many hours of revisions cuts my evenings short.  I'm passed out much earlier these days, and during the time I'm awake, the last thing I feel like doing is coming up with a profound (ha!) post.  At that point, I'm sort of over writing for the day.

I will say today was rough.  I woke up in a good mood; I even treated myself to breakfast at the diner in honor of the excessive heatwave passing through the area.  Unfortunately, it was a bad day for many of my teacher friends, as over 3,000 layoff notices were issued in the city this week.  It sort of bummed me out.  I've been there; as much as I want to be supportive, there is nothing I can say.  Where are 3,000+ people going to find work?  So my mood dropped below zero quickly.  I tried to revise, but my thoughts kept wandering.  And when they didn't wander, I didn't like anything I was doing.  I'm calling today a wash.  Tomorrow will be better.  It HAS to be better.

In the meantime, I've composed a list of announcements for you to check out.  Or, ya know, don't check them out; that's cool too.  Meanie!

Announcements:

1.  If you have not yet checked out my review of The Great Lenore, you can do so here.  Commenting on the post enters you in my final giveaway for a free copy of Jordan's book - and it's a book you most definitely want to read this summer.  The deadline to enter is June 14 - so you still have plenty of time.  I'll announce the winner on June 15, the day The Great Lenore is released in bookstores.

2.  J.M. Tohline is hosting a contest to name a character in his new book Blue The Person.  Further details can be found here; the person who suggests the name chosen by the author will receive a free signed copy of The Great Lenore.  The winner will also receive a book of his or her choice, within reason, that the author will buy and ship to you.  Oh, and you will also be able to tell people you named a character in a book, which is pretty much one of the coolest things ever.

3.  Please join me in congratulating friend and fellow writer Michele Shaw, aka @veertothewrite, who recently landed a literary agent for her YA Romantic Suspense novel.  Michele has been on this road far longer than I have been, and I'm thrilled she is moving forward in the publication process.  Best of luck in the upcoming stages, Michele!

4.  Friend and colleague Draven Ames is participating in a writing contest with Cemetery Dance Publications.  Should you get a chance, hop over and check out his story, Monotonoushere.  If you like it, help my buddy out and vote for his story.  Draven's had a lot of success with online publication this year.  Remember his name, folks.

5.  Just recently, I met a young writer named Michael Guarneiri via Twitter.  Michael's awesome; if you haven't been introduced, you should tweet him hello.  Michael is partaking in an online fable contest.  The top ten stories go through to Paolo Coelho.  You can view his entry here.  If you like it, consider honoring him with another vote.